Latin America: Mental health and burnout

An increasing priority for employers across Latin America

In brief

Burnout in the workplace has become more widely recognized throughout the region. While workforce transformation is not a new concept for global organizations, the pandemic has forced us to rapidly adapt our standard ways of working and how we engage with employees, to ensure employee retention and the long-term viability of the business.

Per a study recently developed by Gallup, 43% of the world’s workers are experiencing daily stress and are, therefore, at risk of developing burnout. However, it was only recently that the World Health Organization (WHO) included it as an occupational disease, which means that companies must be even more prepared to address and manage burnout cases properly. Lack of policies and protocols may aggravate risks for lack of proper employee support. Furthermore, many Latin American countries have undergone complex legal changes, which in many cases resulted in new regulations to protect employees in these situations.


Contents

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